Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Oats

Chocolate and peanut butter are a match made in heaven. But most products and recipes are loaded with tons of sugar, meaning you feel you can’t have this pair any old day. Not with this recipe! Nutritious, delicious and super filling, this oatmeal has no added sugar with all the flavor ūüôā And let me tell you, it was perfect this morning to warm me up on a snow day! As most people know, I am not a big supplement fan¬†but the Garden of Life brand Raw protein is an excellent option every so often when you need a little boost in a carbohydrate dense meal for balance or after a workout. Another great protein¬†is Manitoba Harvest Brand’s new Hemp Pro protein powders. Enjoy this healthy breakfast that seems like a treat ūüôā – there is even a slow cooker option if you think you don’t have the time!
Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Oatmeal (V, GF, DF)

Ingredients for 1 serving:


Just double, triple, quadruple as needed!

1/2 cup oats (40 g)
1 tsp chia seeds
1/2 scoop Garden of Life Raw protein (original)
1.5 tsp cacao powder
Optional: 1/2 tsp maca root powder
Optional: 1.5 tsp unsweetened coconut
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 tbsp peanut butter
1/2 banana, sliced

Directions:
-In a small saucepan, boil 6-7 ounces water (or non dairy milk)
-Add the oats and chia seeds at once and reduce heat to simmer
-Stir frequently to prevent sticking ‚Äď quick oats should thicken within 2 minutes and rolled oats within 5
-Add the protein, cacao, maca, vanilla and stir well
-Pour into serving bowl and top with peanut butter, sliced banana, and coconut
Slow Cooker Version:
-Quadruple above recipe
-Use steel cut oats instead of rolled or quick oats
-Add all ingredients except banana and coconut to glass bowl that will fit into slow cooker basin
-Place bowl in slow cooker, fill slow cooker with water up to 1 inch below top of bowl
-Set on low for 6-8 hours, wake up and enjoy!

Nutrition information per serving:

Calories: 395
Total Fat: 14 g
Saturated Fat: 4 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 5 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 49 g
Fiber: 11 g
Sugar: 9 g
Protein: 24 g

Sodium: 76 mg 5 % Potassium: 375 mg 8 %

Thiamin: 4 %         Riboflavin: 6 %    Niacin: 20 %
Vitamin B6: 21 %    Folate: 7 %
Vitamin C: 7 %        Vitamin E: 10 %    Vitamin A: 1%
Calcium: 4 %         Iron: 37 %             Zinc: 12 %
Magnesium: 21 %   Phosphorus: 18 %

Omega 3: .65 grams (recommended intakes 1.1-1.6g/day)

**vitamins & minerals are listed as % daily value; you may need more
than 100% each day if you’re an athlete, have a deficiency disease, or other medical concerns

Pumpkin Spice Oatmeal

 

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I love all of the seasons, but you really cannot beat the foods in season in the fall. I likely will have many more pumpkin and squash based recipes in the coming months because there are just so many yummy things to do with those ingredients! As food companies and coffee shops are flooding the market with tons of artificial pumpkin spice “foods” and beverages, I love being able to showcase the much more satisfying flavors of real pumpkin and real spice! Today, I’m highlighting my favorite breakfast food {oatmeal} with a quick recipe that has a kick of pumpkin spice! I am posting the quick oats, single serve version here now plan to post a food prep steel cut slow cooker¬†version in the next couple of weeks too, so stay tuned. Even though the ingredients below are for one serving, you can easily multiply each ingredient by the number of servings you need.

Pumpkin Spice Oatmeal (V, GF, DF)

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Ingredients for 1 serving:

1 Cup unsweetened organic soymilk (or other milk or water)
1/2 c (40 g) organic rolled or quick oats (purchase certified gluten free if you have celiac)
1 teaspoon non GMO chia seeds (I use Bob’s Red Mill)
1/4 c pureed organic pumpkin (from home baked or canned*)
1/2 tsp pumpkin spice mix (I use trader joe’s mix)
1/2 tsp organic cinnamon
1 teaspoon cacao nibs or 1 tbsp dark chocolate chips
1 tablespoon almond butter, other nut butter, or 2 tbsp chopped nuts

*Purchasing tip: If I do purchase canned, I buy beans at Trader Joe’s because they do not contain BPA. A risk of using canned foods is that the cans are lined with the carcinogenic chemical BPA. If you don’t live near a Trader Joe’s, click here for brands that are BPA free.
Directions:
-In a small saucepan, boil 1 cup of soymilk (or other milk or water)
-Add the oats and chia seeds at once and reduce heat to simmer
-Stir frequently to prevent sticking – quick oats should thicken within 2 minutes and rolled oats within 5
-Add the pumpkin puree and spices, stir well, and turn off burner
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-Add in your almond butter (or any nut butter) and cacao nibs
-Again, stir well, and EAT!IMG_5967.JPG

 

This makes a quick, easy and filling breakfast any day of the week, but can also be a great night time snack for an athlete looking to refuel and top off carbohydrate stores for training or competition. Combined, the oats, soy milk, and almond butter provide 19 grams of protein to boost the repair process when your body is recovering at night.

Check out my other suggestions for preparing oats here!

Nutrition information per serving (using soymilk, cacao & almond butter):
Calories: 370
Total Fat: 14 g
Saturated Fat: 1 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 6 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 7 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 42 g
Fiber: 13 g
Sugar: 2 g
Protein: 19 g

Sodium: 30 mg 1 % Potassium: 575 mg 12 %

Thiamin: 10 %         Riboflavin: 27 %    Niacin: 8 %
Vitamin B6: 12 %    Folate: 11 %
Vitamin C: 5 %        Vitamin E: 30 %    Vitamin A: 17%
Calcium: 13 %         Iron: 45 %             Zinc: 15 %
Magnesium: 28 %   Phosphorus: 22 %

**vitamins & minerals are listed as % daily value; you may need more
than 100% each day if you’re an athlete, have a deficiency disease, or other medical concerns

Peanut Cocoa Energy Bars

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I adapted this recipe right from my cashew cookie hemp energy bars because I wanted to make a nut free alternative for those with nut allergies! My brother is sadly allergic to tree nuts, but not peanuts, and in trying to find convenience energy bars for him, I had hardly any luck.¬†These can give you a less sweet¬†Reese’s like taste and are great for anyone who loves a PB + chocolate combo food (who doesn’t?). Like my cashew hemp and date/almond bars, these are a good, clean, snack to have in between meals or before a workout. I really like to make a batch of bars every week so we can easily add one to our lunch bag that we take to work.

For those of you who are still getting on your food prep game and might have a nut allergy, I was able to find several Clif Brand bars that per their website, are tree nut free (but not peanut free). Please note that while they do use more natural sources of sugar than most bars, these types of bars are best for physically active individuals due to their sugar content.

  • Clif (original) Bars: Apricot, Chocolate Brownie, Coconut Chocolate Chip
  • CLif Mojo: Peanut butter pretzel
  • CLIF kid zbar protein: chocolate chip, chocolate mint

If you are concerned with any other allergies such as dairy, eggs, soy or wheat, use Clif’s allergen table to see what convenience snacks are safe for you. Now for the recipe!

Peanut Cocoa Energy Bars (Veg, DF, GF)
Makes 12 bars

Ingredients (use organic whenever possible):

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1 1/2 Cups raw or dry roasted unsalted peanuts (I use whole foods 365 organic)
1 Cup raw pitted dates*
1/4 Cup hemp protein powder
1/2 tsp sea salt (omit if using salted peanuts)
2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
3 tablespoons raw cacao (or even cocoa powder if that’s all you have)
Optional: 1 tablespoon maca root powder
Optional: 1 tablespoon raw hemp hearts

*Both Medjool and Deglet Noor work. When using Deglet you may need to add a tsp of water for more moisture
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Directions:

-Add all ingredients to your food processor, dry first and liquid last.

-Pulse until all ingredients are pretty finely ground like in this picture, approximately 1-2 minutes.
If the mixture does not seem sticky enough add another 1/2 tablespoon of honey or even water.

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-Next, pour whole mixture onto a large sheet of wax paper. Fold the paper over the mixture and begin to flatten our with your hands or a rolling pin. I roll mine out to about 1/2 inch thick. Once rolled out to desired thickness, flatten out the edges with hands.

-Cut the pieces evenly into 12 bars. You can obviously cut to larger or smaller if you want, but nutrition info below is for 12.

-Separate the bars and cut the large sheet of wax paper to wrap the bars. Throw one in your lunch bag or purse & store the rest in the fridge for up to 10 days.

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Real Ingredients with Real Benefits:

Dates, in my opinion, are natures candy! They are a source of natural sugar which can be helpful to athletes before and during exercise when they need a quick absorbing energy source. They provide fiber and minerals like potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and even some calcium. Instead of packaged products, I use dates as fuel during long outdoor workouts and even races.

Peanuts are a good source of most B vitamins, especially niacin. They also provide vitamin E, minerals like copper and selenium, and the phytochemical resveretrol (you may have heard of this because it is in red wine) They are known for their heart healthy mono-unsaturated fats.

Hemp protein is an excellent alternative to dairy proteins like whey and casein. Manitoba Harvest is my favorite brand for both protein powder and hemp hearts; they highlight amino acid content here. Other than its protein content, hemp also provides both soluble (great for your heart) and insoluble (excellent for your gut) fiber, potassium, zinc, magnesium, calcium and lots of iron. In addition, hemp protein is a terrific vegan source of omega 3’s.

Maple Syrup is a source of added sugar but can have some benefits if it is 100% pure and is used in moderation. it actually provides teeny amounts of calcium, iron, mangnesium & zinc. One study in 2010 found Canadian Maple Syrup to contain over 26 antioxidant compounds (1)!

Cacao powder is different from cocoa powder in that it is not processed with alkali which can remove some antioxidants and nutrients. When using cacoa, you are getting minerals like iron, magnesium and calcium which help regulate metabolism and keep your blood system and bones healthy. You also get some fiber, and phytochemicals theobromine, phenylethylamine and anandamine which have been found to support brain health and promote well-being.

Maca root has small amounts of calcium, Vitamin C and iron as well as fiber, phytochemical antioxidants and plant sterols which are known to aid in reducing blood cholesterol levels. It is most sought due to claims to boost energy and endocrine function (particularly in females). Maca has been consumed in Peru for thousands of years for these reasons, but there is not a large body of conclusive scientific evidence for those claims. I tried Navitas Naturals brand mostly to see what the hype was about. I enjoy the taste and do feel it provides a small energy boost when I add it to my oatmeal and skip the morning coffee ‚Äď but that is just my feedback, not a research study! Lot‚Äôs of studies related to endocrine function are linked to from a summaryhere and you can evaluate more research at examine.com.

References:

1. J Agric Food Chem 2011 Jul 27;59(14):7708-16. Further investigation into maple syrup yields 3 new lignans, a new phenylpropanoid, and 26 other phytochemicals. Li L, Seeram NP.

Nutrition Information:

Serving Size: 1 Bar
Servings Per Recipe: 12

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Calories: 145
Total Fat: 7 g
Saturated Fat: 1 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 2 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 17 g
Fiber: 4 g
Sugar: 10 g
Protein: 5.5 g
Sodium: 50 mg   5 %
Potassium: 220 mg 5%

Vitamin A: 2%      Thiamin: 10 %               Riboflavin: 5 %
Niacin: 3%              Vitamin B6: 6 %            Folate: 3 %
Vitamin C: 1%        Pantothenic Acid: 5 %
Vitamin E: 3 %       Calcium: 6 %                Iron: 12%
Zinc: 15%                 Copper: 35 %               Magnesium: 20 %
Phosphorus: 15 %  Manganese: 20%        Selenium: 6 %
Omega 3: 0.25 g  (12%)

**Vitamins & minerals are listed as % daily value; you may need more than 100% each day if you’re an athlete, have a deficiency disease, or other medical concerns

Kelly Green Protein Smoothie

Eat Real Live Well // Kelly Green Protein Smoothie

I’ve been making green smoothies for a few months now since it’s gotten warmer and have finally found the perfect blend of ingredients! Sure, I want to recover from my workout be it a run, spin class, or some weight training, but more importantly, post workout food needs to be delicious!!

I am not big on supplements, but Garden of Life Raw Vegan Organic protein is an exception! It is made out of sprouted grains and processed in a way that preserves essential nutrients. The original flavor contains no stevia but the others do. I find stevia upsets my stomach and gives me a headache, so “natural” or not, I personally opt to stay away from it.

Kelly Green Post-Workout Protein Smoothie (Veg, DF, GF, raw)
Makes 1Smoothie

Ingredients:

1/2 Cup frozen mango (70 g)
1/2 Cup frozen strawberries (70 g)
1 scoop Garden of Life Raw Protein (original)
1 tsp Navitas Naturals Maca root powder (optional but adds amazing flavor)
1 Cup Silk Vanilla Unsweetened Almond Milk
2 Cups fresh spinach
Dash vanilla extract

Directions:

I think the order in which you add the ingredients makes a difference in ease of blending (unless you have a vitamix of course, which I don’t – if you want to buy me one send me an email and I’ll gladly give you my address). I add the spinach & fruit first, then protein & maca, and finally the milk and splash of vanilla. Blend as long as you see fit so that its smooth in your blender, bullet or any other smoothie making machine you may have! I find less than a minute is perfect to get the right consistency, somewhere between smoothie and green juice, but a little more on the smoothie side.

 

Eat Real Live Well // Kelly Green Protein Smoothie

Since this is only about 2oo Calories, its a great post workout snack to drink up within an hour of exercise. Have a normal sized meal within 2-3 hours of your workout too.

Nutrition Information:

Servings: 1
Calories: 200
Total Fat: 3 g
Saturated Fat: 0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.6 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 1.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 23 g
Fiber: 8 g
Sugar: 11 g
Protein: 21 g
Sodium: 205 mg   9 %
Potassium: 480 mg 10%

Vitamin A: 57%    Thiamin: 6 %               Riboflavin: 53 %
Niacin: 5%              Vitamin B6: 7 %          Vitamin B12: 125%
Folate: 33 %          Vitamin C: 98%          Vitamin D: 125 %
Vitamin E: 77 %    Calcium:52 %                Iron: 15%
Zinc: 19%                 Copper: 35 %               Magnesium: 23 %
Phosphorus: 7 %   Omega 3: 0.11 g  (6%)

**Vitamins & minerals are listed as % daily value; you may need more than 100% each day if you’re an athlete, have a deficiency disease, or other medical concerns

Cashew Cookie Hemp Energy Bars

Updated 10/23/16
Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Gaia herbs. As always, I only align myself with companies that have philosophies that align with mine. Opinions stated are my own.

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When I started to get into homemade energy bars, I was inspired by the release of Larabars. I began experimenting and the old versions were slowly transformed and this one is my all time favorite. While this recipe has more ingredients than some of my other bars or bites, the flavor is great and they may be slightly more filling from the yummy hemp protein. You can roll these into balls too but, I prefer bars rather than balls Рmuch less messy to make the bars then to roll the mixture in your hands.

This is an awesome option for a bite before an early morning workout or a snack after work before the gym. Continue reading

Farro “fried rice”

After I made this so quickly, for so cheap, and fell in love with OrganicVille Chili Sauce, I knew I had to share it with my family, friends, clients & students. People think the two biggest road blocks to eating healthfully are money and time. It should not cost more to eat more healthfully. If you prepare foods from scratch, it should actually cost less! Secondly, if you spend time planning and doing a little preparation in advance, you can save time (and stress, and money…) compared to dining out or ordering in. This meal is packed with protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals and comes in at $2.43 per serving! Can’t beat that! Continue reading

“Faux Joe’s” – Lentil Sloppy Joe Recipe

*Updated 11/11/2014 with slow cooker version

Sloppy Joe’s don’t have to be a high fat comfort food. In fact, the meal can be heart healthy, nutrient dense, fiber rich, and protein packed, all without sacrificing flavor. When I made my lentil version this past week my husband said it officially topped of his list of favorite home-cooked meals! What’s great is that you can have Sloppy Joe’s on a bun like they’re classically served, or on top of salad greens as I prefer ūüôā

Dry lentils cook much more quickly than dry beans, but you can always save time by tossing all the ingredients in your slow cooker and setting on low for 6-8 hours.

Lentil Sloppy Joe’s the classic way (w/ whole wheat sub roll from Whole Foods):blog 036
Lentil Sloppy Joe Salad (pictured w/ a slice of High Five Great Harvest Bread):lentil sloppy joe salad

Lentil Sloppy Joe on Avocado Toast – Food for Life Brand “Genesis” bread

(Added 8/1/16)


Faux Joe’s – Lentil Sloppy Joe’s
(GF, V, DF)


Ingredients
(see below for beneficial properties of these ingredients):

lentil sloppy joe ingredients

1 cup organic dried lentils – prepared with water as indicated on package
1 Tablespoon avocado or olive oil
3 cloves garlic minced*
1 medium- large onion, diced*
2 large whole carrots, finely diced or shredded*
1 15 ounce can organic diced tomatoes (I used the trader joe’s ones w/ green chiles)
or 15 oz can diced tomatoes + 2 oz canned green chili’s
4 oz tomato paste (2 oz if tomato paste concentrate)
1 Tablespoons 100% pure maple syrup
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon cayenne powder (depending on how much you like heat!)
Fresh ground black pepper to taste

*Purchasing Tips: bagged organic onions are very economical from Trader Joe’s as are bagged organic carrots. Both can also be found for a good deal at BJ’s Wholesale, along with organic garlic.

Stove top Directions:
-Place a large saucepan or stockpot over low-medium heat and add the oil. Spread w/ rubber spatula so that it coats the bottom of the pan.
-Add the garlic and stir for 1-2 minutes (do not let garlic turn brown).
-Add the onions and carrots, stir and cover for 3-5 minutes. Stir occasionally.
-Add the cooked lentils, tomatoes and tomato paste. Stir well.
-Add all the spices, stir well and let simmer, covered for 3-5 minutes.*
-Add the maple syrup, stir, and remove from heat.

*If mixture seems too thick, add 1-2 tablespoons of water at a time until desired consistency is reached.

Slow Cooker Directions:

-Add the garlic, onions, carrots, uncooked lentils, water or broth, tomatoes, tomato paste, spices, syrup at once.
-Set heat on low for 8 hours.
-Stir occasionally if at home/awake. If you do not stir, that’s okay, you may have a small amount of residue on the side of the crock pot though.
-Serve up your dinner that took virtually no time at all!

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Serving Options:

-Dish up 1/6 of the mixture onto bread or roll of choice
-Top mixed greens with 1/6 of mixture
-New idea (10/2013) from my husband: sloppy joe nachos. I don’t eat cheese but he does on occasion and I am aware most readers probably do. Opt for low-fat extra sharp organic cheddar for flavor.

lentils
*Sports Nutrition*
Post endurance workout: Serve with bread, potatoes, or whole grain rice to maximize carb storage.
Post strength workout: as above, but also mix lentils with eggs and scramble.

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Real Ingredients with Real Benefits:

Lentils don’t get as much attention as they should. Per 1/4 C dry serving, at only 180 Calories, lentils provide more protein and iron than beans with 13 g and 3.6 mg respectively. You’ll get lots of B-vitamins from this legume, especially thiamin and folate. They’re also a great source of choline, potassium and many minerals. Lentils are high in both insoluble and soluble fiber; soluble being the type that helps reduce blood cholesterol levels.

Tomatoes pack in lots of Vitamins A, C, and the important fluid balance mineral Potassium. They are well known in terms of phytochemical content for their lycopene which is known for reducing risk of prostate cancer. This was one of the first phytochemicals that really made a name for itself. It is often forgetten that tomatoes also provide other carotenoids and flavonoids such as quercitin.

Onions & garlic are part of the same family, providing the phytochemicals allicin and sulfides which are linked to improved immunity and respiratory health. Onions also provide Vitamins C, B6 and folate.

Carrots are most known for the role in eye health. This is because carrots have a high content of Vitamin A and other phytochemical carotenoids which not only support your eyes but also skin, hair and antioxidant systems. Carrots are also high in Vitamins C & K and the mineral potassium. Antioxidants work to keep your heart healthy and potassium is important for fluid balance and plays a role in maintaining normal blood pressure.

Canola Oil is my go to when I am cooking. While olive oil has great flavor and a good fat profile, canola oil actually has much more omega-3 than olive oil and even less saturated fat. I don‚Äôt eat animal products on a daily basis and my fish consumption is low, so using canola oil in cooking helps me meet my daily needs of omega 3. Since most canola oil in stores is genetically modified, choose an organic brand ‚Äď it will still be cheaper than conventional olive oil.

Cayenne & chili powder all contain capsaicin. Capsaicin has long been used for decreasing joint pain and inflammation topically but in the body may aid in appetite control, metabolism and intestinal inflammation. Oh and you aren‚Äôt the only one who gets a runny nose from spicy food ‚Äď these peppers can all help clear your sinuses!

Oregano actually contains manganese, iron and Vitamins A & K. It can also benefit your immune system as its phytochemicals thymol and carvacrol are anti-bacterial.

Nutrition Information (without lettuce or other toppings):

Servings: 6 (*Athletes may want to split into just 4 servings)
Calories: 205
Total Fat: 3 g
Saturated Fat: < 0.5 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 1.3 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 36.5 g
Fiber: 10 g
Sugar: 10 g
Protein: 11 g
Sodium: 320 mg 14 %
Potassium: 700 mg 15%

Vitamin A: 26% Thiamin: 20% Riboflavin: 13%
Niacin: 12% Pant Acid: 18% Vitamin B6: 25%
Folate: 20% Vitamin C: 20% Vitamin E: 8%
Calcium: 6% Iron: 22% Zinc: 22%
Magnesium: 15% Copper: 46% Selenium: 8 %
Manganese: 53% Phosphorus: 17% Omega 3: 0.3 g (20%)

**vitamins & minerals are listed as % daily value; you may need more than 100% each day if you’re an athlete, have a deficiency disease, or other medical concerns

Updated 11/11/2014

Warming, versatile, nutritious oatmeal recipes

I was a little late in finding out that January has been deemed “National Oatmeal Month”. It didn’t make a difference though as I could probably eat oatmeal twice a day all year long and never get sick of it- it’s my answer to “if you were stranded on a desert island and could only eat one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be?”.

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There are different types of oats you may run into. You want to stay away from oatmeal packets. They are much more processed and often contain less fiber & protein and much more sugar. The “low sugar” varieties almost always have artificial sweetener added – there’s no reason for that!

The least processed oats you’ll see on the shelves are steel cut. They have a little more of a gritty texture compared to what most people are used to and do take much longer to cook (about 30 minutes). I make steel cut when I have a lot of time on my hands and I generally add extra water and cook for longer so they’re a little more mushy in texture. Rolled Oats are essentially steel cut oats that have literally been flattened by rollers; they cook much more quickly (less than 5 minutes) and can be eaten raw too. Quick oats are rolled and/or cut into smaller flakes and can cook in as little as 1 minute.
There is a lot of hype about how much better steel cut oats are for you but other than digesting a little more slowly, the nutrient content is virtually the same as rolled or quick oats. Below I used rolled oats in all of my recipes but plan to make crock pot steel cut apple oats in the near future and will post that too.

Other than tasting amazing there are many reasons to eat oatmeal:

  • Oats contain soluble fiber which is known to bind to and excrete cholesterol from the body
  • They offer more heart benefits due to the antioxidants that prevent damage to the “bad” LDL cholesterol in the body. One serving also has virtually no fat and 0 grams of cholesterol.
  • A compound in oats called beta glucan has been found to benefit the immune system and is associated with better blood sugar management in type II diabetics
  • Because of the minimal processing compared to other grains in our food system, oats retain a lot of the mineral selenium which is a powerful cancer fighting antioxidant that also benefits the heart
  • You can find oats labeled “gluten free” if you have celiac disease or a wheat intolerance*
  • Oatmeal is one of the best breakfast options for athletes pre-competition (or practice/workout). It provides sustained energy from carbohydrates since they are absorbed slowly. Eat one serving (1/2 cup dry) with 1/2-1 banana (depending on your calorie needs) 45 minutes-1 hour before a race.
  • A half cup serving also contributes 5 grams of protein to your diet
  • Other nutrients you’ll get in high amounts include zinc, potassium, iron and folate
  • Inexpensive! I buy organic oats from the bulk section at Whole Foods for next to nothing. Sometimes I switch it up and have Country Choice organic multigrain oat cereal. There are often $1 off coupons on mambosprouts.com.
  • Quick & convenient to cook

*All recipes below are gluten and dairy free & vegan. Be sure to purchase oats labeled as “gluten free” if you have celiac disease. While oats are naturally gluten free, there is possibility of contamination with gluten in the processing facilities.


Oatmeal Prep Basics

One serving of rolled or quick oats is a 1/2 Cup or if you have a food scale, measures out to 40 grams.
*After boiling about 1 cup of water, add the 1/2 cup of oats and reduce to a simmer.
Leave uncovered and stir frequently. When the oats are at the desired consistency remove from heat.
Instead of adding sugar or sweeteners, I generally add a 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract for a flavor boost.
Jazz up the oatmeal with one of the options below.
*If you need to double, triple, quadruple the recipe, follow directions on the container as the more servings you make, the less water you may need.

 

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Option 1
is my favorite way to have oatmeal; with almond butter & a banana.
My favorite almond butters are either the “raw creamy unsalted” version from Trader Joe’s or the grind your own option at Whole Foods. Obviously the latter is the most fresh & least processed but the creaminess of the T. Joe’s one gets me. These 2 options are also very economical at about $4.99/lb versus other brands which can run from $10-15 on average. I saw one brand at whole foods last week that was $34.99! Crazy!

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Most of the time I weigh out fats on the food scale. Even healthy fat sources are very Calorie dense and that can sneak up on you easily! This includes oils, earth balance, nuts & nut butters.
I usually weigh out 1 tablespoon of almond butter which is 16 grams and stir it into the oatmeal well. Top with a small sliced banana and drizzle a teaspoon of honey and you have a delicious, filling and energy boosting breakfast – or even afternoon pre-workout meal (cause we know athletes should never eat just 3 meals…)!

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Nutrition information per serving:
Calories: 359
Total Fat: 12 g
Saturated Fat: 1.5 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 3 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 7 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 58 g
Fiber: 8.25 g
Protein: 10 g
Sodium: 2 mg 0 % Potassium: 625 mg 13 %

Thiamin: 20 % Riboflavin: 20 % Niacin: 9 %
Pant Acid: 13 % Vitamin B6: 30 % Folate: 10 %
Vitamin C: 12 % Vitamin E: 26%
Calcium: 7 % Iron: 15 % Zinc: 20%
Magnesium: 45 % Copper: 41 % Selenium: 27 %
Manganese: 130 % Phosphorus: 30 %

**vitamins & minerals are listed as % daily value; you may need more
than 100% each day if you’re an athlete, have a deficiency disease, or other medical concerns


Option 2: Hemp hearts, chocolate & peanut butter

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Hemp Hearts add crunch to the oatmeal and provide healthy fats, protein & omega-3. I first tried hemp hearts after the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo (FNCE) when I picked up a free sample from Manitoba Harvest. I am a big advocate for plant based diets and after trying hemp hearts, they’ll stay on my grocery list.

For this recipe, I add 1 Tablespoons of hemp hearts, 1/2 a tablespoon of creamy peanut butter (I use Whole Foods or Wegmans brand organic creamy PB), and 3 squares of Green & Blacks brand 70% chocolate bar, chopped.
Mix well and eat up!

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Nutrition Information Per Serving
Calories: 314
Total Fat: 15.5 g
Saturated Fat: 4 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 5 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 34 g
Fiber: 6.5 g
Protein: 12 g
Sodium: 38 mg 3 % Potassium: 195 mg 4 %

Thiamin: 24 % Riboflavin: 6 % Niacin: 9 %
Pant Acid: 7 % Vitamin B6: 10 %
Folate: 4 % Vitamin E: 7%
Calcium: 3 % Iron: 22 % Zinc: 25%
Magnesium: 42 % Copper: 21 % Selenium: 26 %
Manganese: 140 % Phosphorus: 51 % Omega-3: 0.94 g (60%)


Option 3: Blueberry, Pecan & Cinnamon

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After cooking I added 1/2 Cup blueberries and 2 tablespoons pecans (14 grams). I just break apart the pecan halves myself and add them to the oats. I sprinkled some organic cinnamon on top for added flavor & antioxidants.

*This is a fairly low calorie breakfast. To have an adequate meal you can have an egg on the side, or cook with soy or almond milk instead of water.

Nutrition Information Per Serving
Calories: 275
Total Fat: 12 g
Saturated Fat: 3 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 3 g
Monounsaturated Fat: 6 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrate: 40 g
Fiber: 8 g
Protein: 7 g
Sodium: 2 mg 0 % Potassium: 250 mg 5 %

Thiamin: 25 % Riboflavin: 9 % Niacin: 5 %
Pant Acid: 10 % Vitamin B6: 6 %
Folate: 2 % Vitamin E: 5% Vitamin C: 10%
Calcium: 2 % Iron: 13 % Zinc: 20%
Magnesium: 30 % Copper: 40 % Selenium: 24 %
Manganese: 120 % Phosphorus: 16 % Omega-3: 0.16 g (10%)

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The possibilities with oats are endless – add whatever sounds good to you (other than just butter and sugar of course).