On-the-Go Pancake Tacos, 4 Ways!

It’s been a while since you’ve heard from me and it’s because life is just plain busy! So, something that’s been making it a bit easier is making way more meals with simple ingredients… many of which are able to be eaten without utensils in one hand, like these pancake tacos.

On-the-goPancake Tacos

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Hungryroot Plant Based Meal Delivery – Review and Discount Code

Disclosure:  I received free meals from hungry root and since the post have received compensation. for services. All opinions stated are my own. Thanks for supporting brands that make Eat Real Live Well possible!

*Update 8/15/2016: Since a year has passed, this discount code is no longer active. However, Hungry Root often runs specials right on their website!

After returning from California, I immediately traveled to CT for a friend’s wedding and didn’t arrive back home in PA until late Sunday night. We had a few odds and ends to eat on Monday and I was thrilled when a client rescheduled on Tuesday so that I could make it to the grocery store. While I could have made a meal, I was overjoyed when this package was on my doorstep when I got home from shopping!

 

What is Hungryroot?

Hungry root is a new whole foods meal delivery company. The catch is that the meals still need to be prepared… but it only take 7 minutes (if that)! Root vegetables (hence the name) are the base of the meal and you add in the plant based sauces, seasonings and toppings that come with the dish. In just 5 minutes in a pan or microwave, dinner is ready. The meals are chef designed and are all under 500 calories counting the chicken if you order it too. If not, you can add in your own shrimp, egg, or tofu, which is what I plan to do when I order more in the future! The meals are all non-GMO and gluten free as well.

I will be honest that when I opened the packages I thought the small containers of sauces and toppings seemed small. By the end I learned you can’t let the packaging fool you! Hungryroot had offered to send me two meals to try so that I could see if it was something I wanted to suggest or recommend to those I deliver nutrition information to {like you on this blog 😉 }. I don’t remember who chose what but between Tim and I we went with turnip noodles and pesto as well as carrot noodles and a sriracha peanut sauce. While all meals come without chicken to begin, you can add free range chicken when ordering. I did not eat the chicken but ordered it so that Tim could try for my poultry eating clientele and followers.

For our trial, I opened the packages, heated up a dash of avocado oil in a pan, and added the root veggies. I stirred and two minutes later added the other ingredients.

did screw up with the carrot dish though and forgot to add the homemade chimichurri while cooking, so I had to stir it in at the end. Can’t say it would have tasted any different if I added it sooner but it did contribute to how pretty the dish looked as you can see below!

First, pictured below is the turnip noodles with toasted walnut pesto, shredded carrots and chopped walnuts. So pretty!

The pesto was the perfect blend of sweet with a little bite of basil/garlic spice. The turnips were savory and had a hearty texture which I liked. Admittedly this is my first time having turnip noodles – total win! Even though the noodles didn’t look heavily coated with the sauce the flavor was powerful but not overpowering.

Here we have the carrot noodle dish with homemade sriracha peanut sauce and a peanut, cilantro, mint & lime chimichurri and pickled daikon radish. It sounds like it belongs on a high quality restaurant menu and tastes like it too!


T
he carrot noodles had a more fine texture than the turnips but I liked them just the same. I LOVE sriracha and can put it on anything so I knew I would like the sauce. However, this sauce gave a little bit of heat but had so many other great flavors balancing it out too. I couldn’t taste the mint much in the chimichurri but there was a slight sweetness that complimented the sriracha sauce well.

Tim’s was impressed with the chicken. He said it was crispy on the outside but tender inside, with a texture and taste as if it was just grilled. As mentioned above, you can easily cook and egg or some shrimp in the time the noodles are cooking and top with them for protein. I think tofu would also be good but since I like it well done, would take more time.

SO overall, we were impressed by Hungryroot. I was definitely full and I didn’t eat any of the chicken and also didn’t add another protein since I had a late afternoon snack. The flavor was amazing and the food was REAL! I recommend having these meals on hand when you know there is a busy week ahead, or even to take to work once in a while since they are microwavable too. If you are using a meal delivery system like Nutri-systems, go to their website and read your ingredient lists. Compare them to those on the Hungryroot site. You’ll be getting much better quality food and nutrition with this type of meal and you will be taking a small amount of time to prep the food. I think this is where most meal delivery programs go wrong. You cannot promote weight loss and healthy living in a sustainable way unless the person is making the effort to prepare a little and actually change their environment, habits and lifestyle.

Want to try Hungryroot yourself? Head over to their website and enter the code Kelly20 for 20% off your purchase. It is not a first time only code so you can keep using it for future purchases too.  I plan to get 20% off of the beet and sweet potato noodle dishes next – I’ll let you know how they are over on insta! Let me know how you like the meals too!!

Simple Home and Work Changes to Improve Health!

This was written by me and originally posted on the Newtown Athletic Club blog.

March is National Nutrition Month! The campaign theme this year, per the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, is “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle”. Proper nutrition, fitness, and a healthy mind are crucial to maximizing physical and mental health each day. While the NAC is a great place to learn to balance these three areas of life, most people find it harder at home and work where one is spending most of their time. The way your environment is set up alone can promote changes in diet and activity whether good or bad. Here I want to highlight some simple changes that can boost nutrition, fitness and health around the clock!

At home:

Start at the grocery store: write a list of the foods you need for the week and stick to it. If they aren’t in the house, you aren’t going to eat them.

Prep healthy snacks: Even if you aren’t a food prep expert, chopping carrots and peppers ahead of time increases your chances of eating them. Any food that takes work is going to sound less desirable at the end your day. Similarly, prep big salads. If there is a big bowl with washed lettuce and chopped veggies, it’s easier to have before dinner. Just cover with a paper towel and press n’ seal wrap so it doesn’t spoil.

Relocate snack foods: look around your kitchen or other dining areas – do you see snack foods right away? Bread on the counter? Put these foods away and replace them with healthier options that you want to see! If they are in front of you, you’ll choose them over the snacks in the pantry. Ideas like keeping fruit on the counter or kitchen island and putting trail mix in candy bowls are helpful.

Relocate produce: While bowl of fruit on the counter helps, many people tell me they will only eat cold fruit. If this is you, put the fruit at eye level in the fridge! Many people go to the refrigerator when bored and what one sees first is more likely to be eaten. Also rearrange vegetable storage. Put meats and cheeses in drawers and keep vegetables in front of you so they stay on your mind. This is also shown in research to reduce food waste!

Stop eating family style: Leave food on the stove or counter and plate it before sitting down. When food is in front of you, you’re more likely to take seconds. Know someone will still be hungry? Put only vegetables on the table so the extra helping is of a nutrient dense food.

Eat without distractions: Make a rule in your home that there is no eating with the TV on, and no smart phones or magazines are allowed at the table. When we eat with distractions, we are less satisfied from meals because we barely notice, or taste, what we have taken in!

Only wear workout clothes to workout: As Americans we are now conditioned in 2015 to wear yoga pants and Lululemon tops all day long. Make a rule that if you put them on, you have to exercise!

At work:

Store “emergency snacks”: For those weeks that you didn’t food prep, days you left lunch on the counter, and meetings that last too long, emergency snacks are key! Here are some of my top recommendations: flax crackers w/ jar of PB & fruit preserves, plain instant oat packets, nuts, trail mixes, roasted soynuts or chickpeas, unsweetened dried fruit, bars like KIT’s, Larabar, KIND, ProBar.

trail mix

Keep a reusable water bottle: People complain when I tell them how much water they should drink and then say how they drink 4 cups of coffee a day at work. Water boosts metabolism and productivity while decreasing appetite. Having a reusable bottle or cup with goals of how many to drink can increase intake and energy levels. Try the Aqua Tally cup which tracks cups per day. You can get it at https://myaquatally.com/ and use discount code Tally16 for 25% off.

aqua tally

Don’t eat at your desk: This is my biggest goal right now, so I know it is a hard one! Being away from your computer and work increases mindfulness while eating. This means you’ll be more satisfied with your meal or snack, and therefore less likely to want to eat soon after.

Stand up once an hour: Just getting up to stretch once an hour improves not only metabolism but also mental clarity and productivity.

Walk to the furthest bathroom: Every step counts! If you walk further to the bathroom you get to clear your mind a little more and keep your body moving longer.

Sit on a balance ball: Hunched over at your desk all day long? Me too unless I am sitting on a balance ball. It is hard to have bad posture when on it and it also engages your core.

balance ball chairs

Want to learn more to save time, stress, money and benefit your health? NAC members can come to this month’s special nutrition seminar which will cover Food Planning and Preparation. They’ll be held Thursday March 12 and Thursday March 26 at 7 PM. Sign up by emailing me at kellyjones@newtownathletic.com or met@newtownathletic.com. Hope to see you there!

Summer Soup – Sweet and Spicy White Bean

Out of your weekend food prep rhythm because its summer? Add this soup to your list and get back on track! It doesn’t have to be freezing outside to enjoy soup! Even in the summer, soups are a great meal to prep ahead for the week so you have an easy lunch to bring to work,  or dinner ready to go once you’re home after a long day. I used white beans and peas as a protein source and brown rice as a grain. The sweetness of the yellow bell pepper and tomatoes tone down the spice of habenero, and both flavors blend perfectly with some fresh rosemary! And since we eat with our eyes first it’s a good thing all of the ingredients look gorgeous together – all of these colors mean lots of different antioxidants too 🙂

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Sweet & Spicy White Bean Summer Soup (GF, V, DF)

 

Ingredients (see below for beneficial properties of these ingredients): 

1 Tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 – 1 habanero pepper, minced (amount depends on how much spice you like)
1 large red onion, diced
2 medium carrots, diced (about 1- 1 1/2 cups)
3 C fresh beefsteak tomatoes, diced (or 1 can organic diced tomatoes)*
1 large yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 C dry organic brown rice (Trader Joe’s has a quick cook done in 10 min!)
1 C dry white cannellini beans prepped (or 2-2.5 Cups canned)*
1-1.25 Cups fresh or frozen peas
4 Cups (1 container) organic low-sodium vegetable broth (if you like broth-y soup add 2 C water)
-note: Trader Joe’s “organic low sodium hearty vegetable broth” is THE best pre-made broth you will find!
1 Tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped (or 1/2 tablespoon dried)
3/4 teaspoon fresh oregano (or 1/2 teaspoon dried)
fresh ground black pepper to taste

*Purchasing tip: If I do purchase canned, I buy beans at Trader Joe’s because they do not contain BPA. A risk of using canned foods is that the cans are lined with the carcinogenic chemical BPA. If you don’t live near a Trader Joe’s, click here for brands that are BPA free – recently, Muir Glen tomatoes also went BPA free.

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Directions:
-Wash the carrots and peppers and prep all of your ingredients as listed above.
-Place a large saucepan or stockpot over low-medium heat and add the oil. Spread w/ rubber spatula so that it coats the bottom of the pan.
-Add the garlic and habanero and stir for 1-2 minutes (do not let garlic turn brown)
-Add in your rosemary, oregano and pepper (I like to do this early so the flavor infuses better)
-Add the chopped onion, carrots, bell pepper and tomatoes (If using canned tomatoes, wait on those)
-Stir well and cover for 5-10 minutes, stirring occasionally
-Add the broth and bring to a boil
-Add your rice, and reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes. If you did not buy the quick cook brown rice like me, you’ll have to wait about 30 minutes – clean the mess in your kitchen from the prep and do some squats while you’re waiting 🙂
-If using canned tomatoes, add them now and stir the mixture
-Add your white beans and peas
-Add 2 C water if desired. I personally like soup more thick so I leave the extra liquid out. Let simmer another 5 minutes or so and then you’re done!

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While not pictured, I have found I love this most with some diced avocado. It gives it even more of a fresh summer taste and adds even more color. With a side salad this is a perfect lunch at home or work!

 

Real Ingredients with Real Benefits:

Beans are a great source of  potassium, thiamin, vitamin B6, iron, copper, magnesium & manganese. They also provide a little calcium. Phytochemicals include lutein, epicatechin, quercetin and proanthocyanidin these benefit your eyes, reduce inflammation, and support the immune system.

Rice provides a good amount of Vitamin A, Riboflavin, Vitamin C, Riboflavin & Manganese. You can also get phytochemicals like quercetin (great for your immune system and lungs) & several carotenoids. Purchase organic rice as it is not as likely to be contaminated with inorganic arsenic.

Bell Peppers provide you with tons of Vitamin C (even more per serving than citrus when fresh), lots of Vitamin A and fiber as well as Vitamin E, B6 and potassium. Phytochemicals include the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin which are great for eye and cardiovascular health.

They’re finally becoming more known for it but peas are a good source of plant protein! Per 2/3 Cup serving you get 5 grams! As a reference, an egg contains 7 grams. Peas are also an excellent source of Vitamins K, C, A, B1, and folate. They contain the phytochemical coumestrol which has been found in research to reduce stomach cancer risk as well as other phytochemicals with anti-inflammatory properties.

Carrots and are most known for their role in eye health. This is because they have a high content of Vitamin A and other phytochemical carotenoids which not only support your eyes but also skin, hair and antioxidant systems. They are also high in Vitamins C & K and the mineral potassium.

Tomatoes pack in lots of Vitamins A, C, and the important fluid balance mineral Potassium. They are well known in terms of phytochemical content for their lycopene which is known for reducing risk of prostate cancer. This was one of the first phytochemicals that really made a name for itself. It is often forgotten that tomatoes also provide other carotenoids and flavonoids such as quercitin.

Garlic and onions are all part of the same family, providing the phytochemicals allicin, quercitin, and sulfides which are linked to improved immunity and respiratory health. Both onions & leeks provide Vitamin C. Onions are also a great source of vitamins B6 and folate while leeks contribute vitamins A & K in great amounts as well as the mineral manganese.

The heat level of habenero peppers directly relates to their high capsaicin content. Capsaicin has long been used for decreasing joint pain and inflammation topically but in the body may aid in appetite control, metabolism and intestinal inflammation.  In addition they have been found in research to be anti-bacterial, and even anti-allergy due to nutrient content including vitamins A and C, some B vitamins and potassium – and yes its normal for them to clear your sinuses 🙂

Oregano actually contains manganese, iron and Vitamins A & K. It can also benefit your immune system as its phytochemicals thymol and carvacrol are anti-bacterial.

Rosemary contains carnosol which has been found in studies to be an anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory compound and carnosic acid that has neuro-protective (brain &nervous system protective) properties. Some studies show it can aid the GI tract too and as an oil, it has also been used for centuries to improve circulation! Per weight it has a high content of nutrients but since we consume small smounts of it, it provides a little folate, riboflavin, and vitamins A & C as well as the minerals iron, calcium and potassium.

 

Spring Food Prep

Whether it’s not procrastinating on a homework assignment, creating an elevator speech, or making some meals and snacks ahead of time, being prepared helps us when life throws us a curve ball or when it’s just crazy busy in general! As I covered in my first food prep post in the fall taking some time once per week saves time and stress later. When it comes to making decisions about food, you can’t ignore them or put them off. We need to eat at least three times per day in order to feel physically and mentally well. When we make the right decisions, we may not consciously give ourselves enough credit to reinforce those good decisions but unconsciously they are balancing our mental well being, making our brain more sharp, making us feel happier and more energetic. Being prepared with meals and emergency snacks helps us make the correct dietary decisions during crunch time and then influences the rest of our abilities for the day and week.

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If prepping ahead is not something you are in the habit of doing or you are not ready to tackle, read the beginning of my fall post where I highlighted what needs to be done before you commit to planning out your meals (ex: start with a list like the one to the left). Earthbound Farm Organics gives similar tips too.

While prepping food is a major part of my life most Sundays, I have made a commitment to post a new week of food prep each semester. At this point, my students have learned a lot about the science of nutrition, specifically what essential nutrients are, why they are important for the body’s metabolic processes, and where to get the nutrients from. However, we are just now getting to the application. There is no one diet for everyone and to improve health, each individual person needs to focus on small goals/changes that they can make to change bad habits into good ones for the rest of their life. A diet is simply a pattern of eating. What can you do to improve your pattern?

In addition to the above, I always have the follow fresh and ready to eat foods on hand:

Apples, bananas, clementines, nuts & seeds, nut butters, raisins & dates, and not so fresh but still fairly clean rice cakes.

 

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Here is how prepping went:

Sunday morning we decided to have pancakes. I made my buckwheat pumpkin pancakes but used applesauce instead of pumpkin. For the two of us, the whole recipe makes enough for Sunday and a couple of days during the week. You can either cook them all, freeze, and reheat in the toaster or you can cover the batter with press and seal and make fresh the next couple of mornings. I like to make them fresh when I can because then I can add different things for more variety. One morning I added walnuts and banana and topped with peanut butter and this morning I added chopped dark chocolate, unsweetened dried coconut & hemp seeds and drizzled some local honey on top.

20140408-125906.jpg banana walnut buckwheat pancake  Banana, chocolate, coconut buckwheat pancake

Crockpot black beans

After breakfast and the gym and right before church I threw 3 C dry black & pinto beans, 6 cups water, 4 cloves minced garlic, 1 chopped onion, 1 tsp cumin and pepper in the Crockpot and set on high for 8 hours. When they’re done you can mash or use an immersion blender to really get the “refried” texture, or you can just leave as is and they’re still really good. Throughout the week we add these to salads, potatoes, or have with a random grain and vegetable for a meal. Super versatile and if you are a family of less than 4 I recommend freezing half for another week. Also, if you don’t own a slow cooker I don’t know what you’re waiting for. These things are a gift from God to save us all a ton of time.

 


Late afternoon
potatoes and sweet potatoes went in the oven as did asparagus and a chopped red bell pepper for the frittata. I also thinly sliced fresh beets and tossed in olive oil, salt & pepper and baked them. It saves time and energy ($) to cook as much in the oven at once as you can.
While those were in the oven on the stove top I quick cooked some garbanzo beans from dry for hummus, a cup of brown rice, and a package of Trader Joe’s quick cook farro.
With all of that going, I chopped garlic for the guacamole, hummus, soup, and sauce as well as chopped onion for the guac, soup & sauce and jalapenos for the guac. It saves time to chop everything at once so you don’t have to keep going back. With the cutting board out this was a good time to chop carrots and celery for snacks.

When the asparagus & pepper were ready I chopped them and threw them into a bowl with thawed spinach to let cool. The beet chips were all set and went right into a container.

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Food processor came out and I made simple date & cashew energy bars. There’s simple and more fresh than larabars, though I do like my cashew “cookie” hemp bars a little better!

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I put the rice away for sushi night Wednesday and used that burner to cook organic green beans from frozen. Drizzled a little Tubby Olive Tuscan Herb on top with some pepper and those were done in minutes. I then started the white bean soup (but you can prep any soup!) which was also quick since it was vegetarian and while it was cooking made a quick red sauce for the farro.

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Last steps of food prep were making the hummus in the food processor, smashing up the guacamole, and cooking the frittata. Here is a hummus recipe I have up but you can also just throw in garbanzo beans, garlic, salt, pepper, tahini and water, pulse and you’re done. I always have extra garbanzo beans so we can have them on salads. Here is an easy guacamole recipe too. Make it in the storage container so you don’t have to wash an extra bowl. For the frittata, I added 6 eggs to the spinach, asparagus and red pepper mixture and cooked in a large non stick eco pan on low so it wouldn’t burn but would cook through. You can also bake frittata’s. I cut it into 6 pieces and stored in a pyrex in the fridge. Tim eats it for lunch and I even had some with already baked potatoes after a workout one night as dinner.

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The prep I did not do Sunday was crockpot oats Wednesday night so breakfast was ready early Thursday (and Friday) morning for us. 1 Cup steel cut oats, 2 cups almond milk, 2 cups water, cinnamon & vanilla. Low for 8 hours. DONE. Added cacao nibs, coconut, hemp hearts and sunflower seed butter and had some mango on the side.

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Things we still prepared during the week:

We still have to pack lunches every night but its a lot quicker when you just ladle soup or farro into a pyrex and throw lettuce and veggies in another container for a quick salad. Below is the bpa free silicon salad dressing containers I picked up recently at Bed Bath & Beyond too. No one likes soggy salads at work!

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Wednesday was salad & sushi night. After having a salad easily with pre-washed lettuce and some oil & vinegar, we took the already prepped rice and simply chopped up some avocado & shredded some carrot. We rolled out the sushi and had some pickled ginger, low sodium soy sauce & chili sauce on the side. To add protein we also split a package of organic frozen edamame that was easily heated up in a pot in minutes.

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Hope you are feeling inspired to start prepping on your own. I promise its so much better to only have to reheat food after a long work and/or school day! While it seems like a lot of work above, it only took about 3 total hours which would have added up to a lot more cooking breakfast and dinner each individual day of the week. You’ll also spend less time doing dishes! If you already prep, maybe there are some new ideas above too. As my students already know, I am always open to comments and question. Have a healthy weekend!

Fall Food Prep

I am writing this post specifically for my students. They have learned about the science of food and nutrition up to this point in class and this week, they are taught how to actually apply it to their life to be more healthful. The biggest complaint I hear about from students is that eating healthy food is too time consuming. I especially hear this from students who are also parents coming back to school. Just like studying outside of class requires time management, so does your meal plan! How can you possibly stay energized to take on school, work, exercise and family time without eating well? I know I wouldn’t be able to! So it all comes back to planning and preparation. Taking a few hours one day to prepare a couple of meals and ingredients for later in the week will make your life less stressful and will save time, money and energy later.

First, it is important to have a running grocery list at all times. I cannot imagine going to the grocery store without a list! {{How some people manage, I will never know}} For some of you maybe this is your first goal. Get accustomed to having a grocery list of things you actually need for the coming week. Put a notepad on your fridge or by the family computer to update when you realize you need something. Also, if you make a time saving rule that you won’t run back to the grocery store Monday-Friday, you will be sure to get everything you’ll need on that list. Oh yeah, and only put healthful nutrient dense foods on the list. If you only have nutritious foods in the house, you’ll only eat nutritious foods.

list2  list

Once making grocery lists is just a part of your lifestyle and you don’t need to give it a second thought, your second step is to make sure those lists actually correspond with meals you are going to prepare for the week. Start just by having a plan for dinner each night. This means that yes, you will choose what you will be eating for the coming week ahead of time. Ditch the excuse of “but what if I don’t feel like X on Wednesday”. If you have 4-5 meals planned you can move them around! This way you are going to buy only what you need and be much less likely to eat junk or order out. After planning dinners becomes part of your lifestyle, start to include breakfast, lunch and snacks in your planning.

Now, if you’ve gotten used to the organizational side of things on paper, that doesn’t mean it has been easy to throw those meals together each night. So this is what makes life the easiest: weekly food prep. Based on your family’s schedule, Sunday may not be the best day for you to prep so evaluate your week and pick whatever day is easiest for you. For me, it is Sunday so in the fall, I do all my food preparation while football is on (we are lucky enough that the kitchen is connected to the living area and I can see/hear the TV). This way, I get to pay attention to the games but instead of sitting on my butt, I check things off my to do list and make eating healthy meals and snacks easier the rest of the week. I know there is no way especially Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, that I am going to get a workout in and make a satisfying healthy dinner, so food prep has become a big part of my life. Below I have an example of a typical week of food prep in the fall. I think fall and winter are sometimes the easiest seasons for meal prep because of one pot meals like soup, chili, and even crockpot oats for the morning.

A couple of things that I do most weeks are prepping black beans and garbanzo beans from dry and baking potatoes and sweet potatoes. You can do both of these things at the same time. I prefer dry beans over canned because it is much more fresh and also easier than wondering if the cans are lined with BPA (since most cans are). Plus, its more economical. I usually prep 1/2 of a 1 lb bag but you could prep the whole bag if you have a big family or if you want to freeze half.

Since the oven is on, I typically maximize the space and energy being used by baking or roasting something else. This week I roasted brussel sprouts, cauliflower, carrots and onion. I also put a poblano pepper in to roast for hummus as well as a delicata squash and an acorn squash, each halved.

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Prepped & Drained Beans // Red Potatoes & Sweet Potatoes  // Veggies for roasting

While the beans were finishing up I started chopping ingredients for the soup & sloppy joes below. I was sure to chop enough onions and garlic for both of those recipes at the same time. I put some farro on the stove that I used to make this quick dish with it Wednesday night, and also used some for a salad during the week. When the beans were done, I started to make my potato kale and leek soup. With that going, I also started my cooking lentils for my lentil sloppy joes.

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Potato, Leek & Kale Soup            //  Lentil Sloppy Joes

Each week it is essential to have fresh fruits & veggies available for snacks at all times. We always rinse romaine & mixed greens and have a lot ready in a huge salad bowl in the fridge. In addition, I will chop carrots, celery and when we have them peppers and other veggies to dip into hummus as a snack. I make my own hummus too since its much more fresh. Red chili pepper hummus is my go-to but this week I used the roasted poblano and garbanzo beans to switch it up. I don’t have any hummus recipes on the blog but here are lots of simple ideas: hummus.

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Chopped veggies                  Roasted Poblano   Poblano Hummus

Now what do you do with this stuff during the week?

I always have garbanzo beans leftover after making hummus. My husband loves them plain as a snack but I prefer to add them to salads.

Black beans are also something we add to salad (below w/ avocado) and one day I added to half an acorn squash w/ farro, brussels & hummus and brought it to work for lunch (left below). On Thursday I made a half batch of quick black bean soup. Again, no recipe on the blog but here is a crockpot one (aka throw ingredients in and its done in 8 hours without you doing anything else).

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Potatoes are generally eaten by us alongside veggie packed omelets or with black beans and topping of choice (salsa, hummus, guacamole). Obviously possibilities are endless with this food so do what you wish (other than adding butter, bacon, sour cream, cheese etc). I often have sweet potatoes right out of the fridge as a pre-workout snack after work. You could also throw this recipe together quickly.

The roasted carrots, brussel sprouts and cauliflower were added to salads this week but could easily be thrown into a tortilla wrap or omelet for a meal too. I even dip brussel sprouts in hummus as a snack! I also mixed the brussels with farro in a pan with some garlic and olive oil and added them to one half of delicata squash for dinner one night. I liked it so much it became lunch at work the next day too.

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As mentioned above I used most of the farro for my farro fried rice, and it should be self explanatory that you eat the kale soup for lunches and dinners. The sloppy joes have recommendations for serving within the post itself.

For other ideas on food prep, head over to the blog of another Registered Dietitian, The Lean Green Bean who has lots of posts on the topic!

Hope this is helpful and feel free to leave comments and questions below!